Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Swallowtail and Cactus part 3


Catclaw Cactus
One of my favorite photographs, showing the multicolor transparent spines of this Fishhook Cactus (Sclerocactus uncinatus) bought from Rio Grande Cacti out of New Mexico.  This cactus, also known as the Catclaw Cactus, is native to West Texas, likes it very hot and dry and is hardy to at least 10 degree Fahrenheit.
Mammillaria pottsii



Heraclides rumiko
Heraclides rumiko aka Papilio rumiko

Papilio rumiko
Heraclides rumiko aka Papilio rumiko


Thursday, June 16, 2016

Swallowtail and Cactus part 2

Papilio rumiko
I raised this butterfly, a Western Giant Swallowtail (Heraclides rumiko / Papilio rumiko), in a plastic jar during the winter, to my surprise he decided to eclose on a rather cool day.  I took him outside and let him dry his wings in my cactus garden.  He hung out for about two hours (which made him easy to photograph) before flying away when the sun came out.

Heraclides rumiko

Western Giant Swallowtail

Western Giant Swallowtail

Friday, June 10, 2016

Swallowtail and Cactus part 1








Western Giant Swallowtail
Western Giant Swallowtail, (Heraclides rumiko) aka (Papilio rumiko).


Papilio rumiko
I spent a long time learning what kind of butterfly this was (since there are several that are very similar).  For those interested in some light reading here is the document that helped me come to my final conclusion A new Heraclides swallowtail (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) from North America is recognized by the pattern on its neck.


Darth Small
This little cactus (Echinocereus russanthus) is mostly unremarkable, small marooon colored flowers, but today the red glowing spikes were picture worthy.  My new nick name for this guy is Darth Small.


Golden barrel cactus
Golden barrel cactus, Echinocactus grusonii

Friday, June 3, 2016

Ferocactus Wislizeni

Ferocactus Wislizeni
Fishhook Barrel Cactus, largest barrel cactus native to Texas (far west El Paso area) hardy to 5 degrees.


Ferocactus Wislizeni
Flowers look like a camp fire.  The cactus stem is apparently eaten in Mexico, chopped into small pieces and soaked in sugar.  I can't imagine that it would make a good candy but I will have to post pone judgment until I can try one for myself.



Coryphantha macromeris, hardy to at least 14 degrees.  Macro being "large" and meris "parts" most likely refers to the spines which are quite large for a Coryphantha.  I have seen pictures of this growing in clumps three feet across, I wonder how long that takes?  It appears to grow about an inch every three years.


Nice combination of blooms from late June, most other cactus bloom much earlier.